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Direct Access = No Referral Needed

Lingering sports injury got you down? Nagging back pain bothering you? Consider heading to a conveniently located, qualified physical therapist to treat those problems.

“But wait,” you say, “Aren’t I first obligated to set up an appointment with my doctor, and get a prescription from him/her BEFORE I come to physical therapy?”
Actually, NO. You can come straight to physical therapy. The Wisconsin Direct Access Law allows you to directly seek physical therapy for treatment rather than first requiring a script from a physician. This benefits you in a variety of ways.

How does this benefit you? If you ever find yourself experiencing pain you would likely call your primary physician, wait for an appointment which could take a couple weeks, get prescribed medications for 2-4 weeks and then get told you need to receive physical therapy or see another specialist. Physical therapists can cut out that middle man, save you time, and prove to be cost-effective by saving you money through less visits to get better, faster and less time is taken from work and other life activities.

Several physical therapy clinics (mostly the private practices) can offer you what some call a “Pain Assessment or Consultation” which is typically a free injury evaluation, diagnosis, and recommendation for treatment from a physical therapist. This recommendation may include seeing a specialist, for testing, or to start physical therapy. All of which would be the same answer you would get from your primary physician at a cost and who wouldn’t be able to treat you. Physical therapists now have a doctorate degree, are state licensed and have the ability to diagnose and determine whether physical therapy is the right choice for your condition.

So next time you find yourself experiencing a nagging pain keeping you from your normal everyday activities or recreational activities you enjoy, consider a Pain Assessment by calling your physical therapist before spending the time and money to see your primary physician.

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